Category Archives: Culture

Information regarding my favorite record store

Posted: 22 Oct 2013 06:00 PM PDT

beacon sound

 

 

Portland record store and label Beacon Sound will be releasing a collaborative album by Peter Broderick (Efterklang) and Gabriel Saloman (Yellow Swans) in early 2014. This is the first time these two artists have worked together, despite sharing deep Portland roots as well as labels like Type and Mort Aux Vaches. They’ll be recording at Type Foundry Studio (Decemberists, Grails, Glass Candy) with audio engineer Jason Powers. There is a Kickstarter campaign happening right now to fund the vinyl edition of the album; it’s running for another week and is currently over 60% funded.

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/850321533/beacon-sound-the-label

Artist Bios:

Peter Broderick is a multi-instrumentalist who grew up in Carlton, Oregon and played with Portland groups such as Horse Feathers and Loch Lomond. In 2007 he was invited to work with Danish group Efterklang (currently signed to 4AD) and moved to Berlin. Over the course of the last six years he has released several acclaimed solo albums on labels such as Type and Erased Tapes, collaborated with the likes of Machinefabriek and Nils Frahm, and traveled the world with Efterklang, who debuted their most recent album Piramida with the Sydney Symphony Orchestra at the iconic Sydney Opera House in May 2012.

Vancouver-based Gabriel Saloman was one half (with Pete Swanson) of influential noise duo Yellow Swans. Their prolific run of albums, EP’s, collaborations, and world tours culminated with the incredible Going Places on Type Records. He is also an accomplished artist and has been exhibited at the Walker Center, California College Of The Arts, and the Manifesta biennial in Murcia, Spain. His excellent debut solo album ‘Adhere’ (on Berlin label Miasmah) has garnered rave reviews.

 

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Filed under Culture, lifestyle, Music, press

3 new projects commencing September 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kitchen remodel, along with 3 baths in SW Portland. The kitchen was torn out on Monday September 10th, more photos to follow.

                                                                                                                                                                      

1950’s home restoration in Lake Oswego, very similar to one you may have seen before on this site. Same builder – different location.

Skylights are being installed, floors are being refinished, new oak floor to match to be installed in kitchen, furniture being purchased, kitchen slated for restoration. More photos to follow.

                                                                                                                                                                       

 

 

 

 

1950’s restoration of an ocean front property in Manzanita, Oregon. Existing photos above, exterior renderings below.

Exterior work to begin soon and to include new roof, windows, siding and decks. Interior work to follow. Stay tuned for updates.

 

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Filed under carports, color, Culture, design, Furniture, manzanita, Paint, press, Remodeling, Restoration

take-root

I met Julie Pointer at a YU Contemporary founders dinner, while she was there observing the art of the table and assisting John Taboada from Navarre with the preparation of the food and serving. The table, in my opinion, is roughly translated in how people come together to break bread, and the ways in which magic can happen when meals are shared and when one least expects it.

She has been attending a 2-year joint MFA program between PNCA and OCAC, called Applied Craft and Design.
The program focuses particularly on merging craft/design solutions with relevant social and environmental issues, and has an entrepreneurial push to it.

Julie has been observing time, place and environment, recently completing the massive undertaking of providing an artistic backdrop, along with table settings and pot luck assignments, for an outdoor meal. Gifting this, her thesis, to her direct neighbors and community where she lives in SE Portland, she created what I believe is so desired by many, that of creating relationships around sharing food together. I have been following her blog for awhile now, and am always amazed at her perception of beauty in the natural environment, the simplicity in which she weaves items together to create a whole new world for this one event. Whether through the invitations lovingly prepared or to the thought in which she chose the dinnerware, and brought together perfect strangers for a captivating event on May Day. She is someone to watch. The inspiration pages that she created as a backdrop for where she was headed with the final project are something that seems to have come from my dreams, I love the way her eyes and design sense capture exactly what I think is quite exquisite and complete to me.

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Filed under color, Culture, design, Furniture, landscape, lifestyle, nature

YU Contemporary Art Center

YU hosted it’s first dinner for founding members yesterday evening. The meal was prepared by Navarre’s chef/owner John Taboada, with wine provided by Carlton Cellars and Martelo winery. The history of contemporary art in Portland for the last 30-40 years was distinctly represented around the table by Mary Beebe, Mel Katz and Jay Backstrand from PCVA 1972-1987. I was struck most by the intrinsic marriage that I feel must take place between the old guard and the new, with Portland sorely lacking in a contemporary arts facility and home. YU has the capability to become larger than anyone can conceptualize at this point of it’s early inception. The promise is high and I believe that it will be met.

I wanted to recommend attendance to this event this evening.

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Art in the Garden Lecture:

Just Enough: Lessons in Living Green from Traditional Japan, Author Azby Brown

(images courtesy of Just Enough’s website)

Portland Japanese Garden hosts a lecture on green living next Friday, January 28th with Tokyo-based author Azby Brown.

Friday, January 28, 2011
5:30-7:30pm; Pavilion
$10 members / $15 non-members
Reservations required, space is limited
Purchase on-line or call (503) 542-0280

(from Portland Japanese Garden’s website)

Inspired by his first visit to Katsura Imperial Villa in the 1980s, Tokyo-based author Azby Brown went on to pursue a career in architectural design, ultimately writing The Genius of Japanese Carpentry and a number of other successful books, including Small Spaces, The Japanese Dream House, and The Very Small Home. A graduate of Yale, Brown is a professor of architectural design at the Kanazawa Institute of Technology, and founder and director of the Future Design Institute in Tokyo. His presentation will be on his latest book, Just Enough: Lessons in Living Green from Traditional Japan, published in 2010.

Through words and sketches, Just Enough tells how people lived 200 years ago during the late Edo period in Japan, when traditional technology and culture were at the peak of development, just before the opening of Japan to the West. Brown shows how people in the 18th-19th centuries dealt with some of the same issues we are facing today—energy, water, materials, food, and population—and forged from these challenges a society that was conservation-minded, waste-free, well-housed, well-fed, and economically robust, and that has bequeathed to us enduring standards of art and beauty.

The lecture will include reflections on Katsura Imperial Villa as the inspiration for Brown’s lifelong career in Japanese architecture and design, as well as his insights into the lessons to be learned from traditional Japan on ways of living green in a densely populated urban society.

A book-signing will follow the lecture.  Buy the book here!



Azby Brown:

A native of New Orleans, Louisiana, Azby Brown is an artist and designer who has lived in Japan since 1985. He is the author of The Genius of Japanese Carpentry (1995), Small Spaces (1996), The Japanese Dream House (2001) and The Very Small Home (2005). His most recent book, Just Enough: Lessons in Living Green from Traditional Japan was published in 2010. On the faculty of the Kanazawa Institute of Technology since 1995, he is the director of the KIT Future Design Institute in Tokyo.

Read More: Essay by Azby Brown on The Design Observer Group website.

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Filed under architects, books, Culture, design, lifestyle

Indigo is the Color of My Dreams – exhibit at Japanese Gardens

Among the oldest dyes used for textiles, indigo was widely used throughout India, China, Japan, the Middle East, and West Africa.  In Japan, during the Edo period when silk was outlawed, indigo dye became especially prominent as cotton began to be used for textiles. Even today, indigo is the dye of choice for summer kimonos.

Indigo textile artist Shihoko Fukumoto’s beautiful linen and flax panels are currently on display at the Japanese Garden. Bridging traditional and modern methods, Shihoko masterfully achieves deep blue tones using traditional Japanese dye techniques.

Indigo is the Color of My Dreams

October 30 – November 28, 2010

Monday 12 – 4

Tuesday – Sunday 10 – 4

*Tea ceremonies will be held Sundays from 1 -3 pm in the Fukumoto Indigo Cube in the center of the pavilion.

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Excited about – Little Winter Market – Ace Hotel this weekend

photo courtesy of the little winter website

At the cleaners at the Ace Hotel | 1022 SW Stark 503-228-2277

11-6 Saturday, November 6 | 11-5 Sunday, November 7

www.littlewintermarket.com

vendors |

 

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